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Bruins are considered the best team in the nation in key discipline

Things are looking good for the UCLA Bruins.

After scoring just 16-17 points in the 2023-24 season and missing the NCAA tournament entirely, the team underwent a complete remodel in the offseason by Mick Cronin as the program's longtime head coach turned his focus to the national team and the NCAA transfer portal.

Now UCLA has received great recognition for its long history of success in one important area.

According to John Fanta of Fox Sports, the Bruins are considered the best team in developing young talent in all of college basketball, beating big-name teams like Duke, Kansas, Kentucky and Gonzaga.

It's unclear how long that development plan will last. Since Cronin took the helm in 2019, five of his former players have been drafted: guard Peyton Watson (pick No. 30 in 2022), All-American small forward Jaime Jaquez Jr. (pick No. 18 in 2023), Pac-12 All-Freshman Team shooting guard Amari Bailey (pick No. 41 in 2023), two-time Pac-12 All-Defensive Team shooting guard Jaylen Clark (pick No. 53 in 2023) and Pac-12 Defensive Player of the Year center Adem Bona (pick No. 41 in 2024).

That's a far cry from the top talent coming out of some of the programs directly below UCLA on this list. But over the course of the program, that assessment is of course entirely accurate. The Bruins boast several active alumni who have reached All-Star heights in the league, including guards Zach LaVine and Jrue Holiday, the latter of whom is a two-time champion. Two former UCLA draftees from 2008, point guard Russell Westbrook and power forward/center Kevin Love, are future Hall of Famers. In its history, the team has produced such all-time Hall of Fame luminaries as Kareem Abdul-Jabaar, Bill Walton and Jamaal Wilkes.

Although Cronin's run hasn't produced an All-Star yet (Jaquez might be able to do it after being a surprise All-Rookie First Team selection in a season in a highly competitive class), he still has time to change that.

More UCLA: How Zach LaVine is dealing with the icy trade market